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Tactical Response Vehicles FAQ

Tactical response vehicle

 

What are Tactical Response Vehicles (TRVs)?

TRVs are a small LGV style vehicle (10 tonne) which are slightly smaller than a standard fire engine (15 tonne). This vehicle type was selected over a pick-up or van based vehicle as it provides far more flexibility with weight capacity and storage for equipment.

How many does the Service have?

There are six TRVs in use by the Service. They replaced one of the two wholetime fire engines at Harrogate and Scarborough and the one wholetime fire engine at Malton, Northallerton, Ripon and Tadcaster. They have been placed on stations where there is also a standard fire engine available immediately, or available within 5 minutes to respond to emergencies.

Station

Vehicles (not including special vehicles)

Harrogate

One wholetime shift crewed TRV and one wholetime shift crewed fire engine

Malton

One wholetime day-crewed TRV and one retained crewed fire engine

Northallerton

One wholetime day-crewed TRV and one retained crewed fire engine

Ripon

One wholetime day-crewed TRV and one retained crewed fire engine

Tadcaster

One wholetime day-crewed TRV and one retained crewed fire engine

Scarborough

One wholetime shift crewed TRV and one wholetime shift crewed fire engine

Shift: This is a working pattern (or duty system) whereby wholetime firefighters work 10 or 14 hour shifts. Fire engines staffed by this system can be mobilised within one to two minutes.

Day crewed: This is a working pattern (or duty system) whereby wholetime firefighters work day shifts and are on call from home during the evenings and at night. Fire engines staffed by this system can be mobilised in around one to two minutes during most of the day and within five minutes the rest of the time.

Retained: This is a duty system whereby part-time firefighters are alerted to emergencies by pagers and respond to the fire station. Fire engines staffed by this system can be mobilised within five minutes

Why have they been introduced?

The Tactical Response Vehicles (TRVs) have been introduced as part of the review of fire cover, which was undertaken as the number of incidents the Service attends over recent years* has reduced significantly.

 * There was a 32% reduction in calls between 2002/03 and 2012/13. In 2002/03 we attended 11,248 incidents, in 2012/13 we attended 7,659. The downward trend is continuing with 6,600 incidents attended in 2016/17.

The review of fire cover was carried out to:

  • Ensure the Service balances cost and resources to risk and to ensure, as far as possible, that the provision of resources relative to risk is similar across the whole county and the City of York.
  • Ensure the Service can provide a response to incidents that is appropriate for increasingly frequent large weather related events (e.g. flooding).
  • Ensure the Service has a model of fire cover that is capable of delivering savings, according to the financial constraints (over the life of the review).
  • Take into account the impact of a reduction in incidents over the last 10 years.

 ‘Fire cover’ is the term used by the Service to refer to;

  • The number of fire engines, other specialist fire vehicles and equipment, available within the Service to respond to fires and other emergencies.
  • Where fire stations are located.
  • How quickly fire engines can respond to an emergency call (i.e. how they are staffed).

You can find out more about the consultation undertaken on the Fire Cover Review here: http://www.northyorksfire.gov.uk/news-events/public-consultations/fcr_jul15/

When did TRVs start responding to emergencies?

The TRVs started responding to emergency incidents at the following times:

January 2017              Scarborough  

February 2017             Northallerton

February 2017             Tadcaster

April 2017                   Harrogate

September 2017           Ripon

September 2017           Malton

 How many crew members are there on TRVs?

 The TRVs are crewed with three staff instead of four or five on standard fire engines, however they can be staffed with up to five crew members if necessary during busy periods e.g. flooding and moor fires.

 What types of incidents do they attend?

The TRVs respond to, and are able to deal with, small incidents, such as bin fires, on their own and are sent along with standard fire engines to larger incidents such as house fires and road traffic collisions.

What actions can a crew of three take at an incident?

A crew of three can undertake initial actions at an incident such as; scene safety, vehicle stability, first aid, external firefighting, carrying out risk assessments, requesting further resources as necessary, and preparing the incident for oncoming support appliances.

How will a crew of three wear breathing apparatus?

The Tactical Response Vehicles have breathing apparatus sets provided to ensure that firefighters have the highest level of respiratory protection when dealing with incidents that could compromise their health due to smoke e.g. car fires.

At incidents where other crews are also in attendance, the breathing apparatus from the TRV can be used in accordance with recognised command and control procedures.

Have staff had special training on the vehicles?

Crews at stations where TRVs are based have received familiarization training on both the vehicle and the equipment carried, and have also undertaken specific incident scenario training.  

There is also a specific Standard Operating Procedure for the vehicles.

What is the technical specification of the vehicles?

  • Iveco 10 tonne chassis
  • Semi automatic
  • Standard cab with 5 seats

What equipment is carried on the TRVs?

  • Standard Pump with inbuilt foam making capability
  • Arrived at scene facility (one button for lighting and to engage pump)
  • Battery operated cutting equipment for use at road traffic collisions
  • Enhanced stabilisation equipment
  • Immediate Emergency Care packs (first aid equipment)
  • Breathing Apparatus for respiratory protection
  • One hose reel and six lengths of standard fire hose
  • Fog spike, (a device which can penetrate a building from the outside to suppress a fire inside the building)
  • Fire extinguishers and fire blanket
  • Short extension ladder
  • Lighting
  • Water safety equipment and throw lines
  • Axe, crowbar, battery saw, shovel, tool kit, etc.
  • Radios, mobile phone and Mobile Data Terminal

 TRV with lockers open

TRV locker open

 

Tactical response vehicle1

 

 

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